TEACH-ing Technology, Tools & Tidbits

Using Twitter in Medical Education – Give tweeting a try!

Twitter can serve as a meaningful social networking tool to engage and collaborate with learners! This “micro-blogging” service allows users to create posts consisting of 140 characters or less that can be categorized and searched using hashtags. Students, organizations, libraries, journals and faculty members across the medical community are making the most of Twitter to create connections and valuable learning moments. Twitter can be used to communicate announcements, provide study information, share resources and to promote upcoming educational events. Real time classroom applications for Twitter include connecting students, fostering learning collaboration, student polling and for receiving curricular feedback. If you are interested in trying Twitter, consider these quick tips: 1) Ask questions to open a dialogue with colleagues and learners 2) Always Tweet with value 3) Utilize hashtags to link posts.

To learn more about using Twitter in Medical Education, please read the Medical Teacher Twelve Tips article. (Click here.) This article summarizes how Twitter has been described in the medical literature and shares practical reasons for using Twitter.


TEACH-ing Technology in the Classroom

If you are interested in reducing the amount of didactic teaching you incorporate into each lecture consider exploring interactive learning methods appropriate to your subject matter. Take a fresh look at the way you plan and present your teaching by integrating interactive learning into your course curriculum!

As part of the Health Professions Educator (HPE) Series (offered by TEACH and intended for educators who teach through Carilion, Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine & Research Institute), Dr. Corey Heitz has presented several practical and informative lectures aimed at sharing interactive learning resources with faculty. The PowerPoint presentations and archived recordings are available on the TEACH webpage.

Topics include:

  • Technology in the Classroom
  • ARS in the classroom
  • Engaging Learners with NearPod
  • Revving up PowerPoint

Click here to view: http://info.vtc.vt.edu/teach/teach-health-professions-educator-series-videos/#TechnologyintheClassroom


Introduction to Academic Technologies

Did you know that Carilion has an Academic Technologies department? Our goal is to promote good instructional design and encourage and support the use of technology to improve teaching and learning throughout Carilion Clinic. We do this several ways. Most importantly, we help faculty apply instructional design principles to the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of their course materials.

What is Instructional Design?

Instructional designers have expertise in applying research-based principles and best practices to the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of educational experiences. We can provide consultation and support during the design and development of these experiences and make recommendations for strategies and technologies to meet specific learning objectives. These experiences can take the form of lessons, workshops, courses, or programs and can be delivered face-to-face or online through a system such as Blackboard.

How Can Academic Technologies Assist You?

In a nutshell, here are some of the things we can help you with:

  • Designing, developing, and implementing educational content and activities
  • Identifying appropriate technologies to achieve learning outcomes
  • Training in all functions of Blackboard and associated technologies (e.g., Collaborate, Respondus, SafeAssign)
  • Student engagement technologies such as i<clickers and Nearpod
  • Integrating audio and video with PowerPoint
  • Test creation and management
 How to Get in Touch With Us

If you are interested in learning more about the services provided by Academic Technologies or need assistance, please contact one of our instructional designers:

Jenny Ferguson, MEd – jrferguson2@carilionclinic.org

David Halpin, PhD – dmhalpin@carilionclinic.org

Shani Salifu, PhD – ssalifu@carilionclinic.org